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Intel_Hydralisk
26th December 2004, 09:49 PM
Is there a way you can check what kind of ram you have (more than just the amount) without physically opening up the case and taking a look?

TheOne
26th December 2004, 10:21 PM
Nope. At least I haven't ever seen anything that can.

The most programs are able to tell you is how much you have...

But it's not that hard to open the case and tell what you've got.

Phyrus
26th December 2004, 10:45 PM
by kind you mean brand name or w/e (kingston, generic etc), the only way to do it is by opening your computer, you pretty much have no choice :/ just make sure you know what youre doing as 'cos with computers that come in packages, onces you rip off the warranty seel you lose the warranty.

by kind you mean size, well... thats almost common knowledge (right-clicking "my computer" then going to properties)

John Basedow
26th December 2004, 11:10 PM
If you have the manufacturer's manual, you could probably look up the motherboard specifications to see what kind of RAM you need (ex. PC-3200, PC-4000, etc), how many RAM slots are available, and other details.

If you have a Dell, I'm sure there's tons of documentation on what components you should buy. :chilli: :chilli:

Phyrus
26th December 2004, 11:19 PM
If you have the manufacturer's manual, you could probably look up the motherboard specifications to see what kind of RAM you need (ex. PC-3200, PC-4000, etc), how many RAM slots are available, and other details.

If you have a Dell, I'm sure there's tons of documentation on what components you should buy. :chilli: :chilli:

hes asking how to look what type of ram he has without opening his computer, not what to look for in purchasing :/

John Basedow
27th December 2004, 12:01 AM
Right... So if he has a manual, he can open the manual and look inside to see what kind of RAM he has inside his computer, or what type of RAM he needs to buy in case he needs to buy more.

It serves the same end.

Assuming you didn't build your own computer, which is a safe assumption, the thing probably came with loads of documentation. Try leafing through some of the manuals.

White_Hindu
27th December 2004, 06:43 AM
Just to clarify, I don't think he's looking for the brand name, he's looking for the RAM type like Kendros said. I do believe there's a way, but it involves downloading diagnostic programs that potentially host spyware.

John Basedow
27th December 2004, 07:31 PM
You could TRY downloading the Nvidia NForce utility. I have no clue whether or not you have an NVidia motherboard, but it's worth a shot.

www.nvidia.com for the program. It's under downloads>utilities. If you want, I could send it to you via AIM: Ninjakender/Phunkmazstuh.

For me, at least, it shows me both the vendor/manufacturer and the type of RAM I currently have installed in my box (I have two 256MB PC3200 [DDR400] made by some shitty company named Elixer {this is all shown to me via the program}).

Edit: Just a warning, do NOT mess with the overclocking options. I have no idea what they may or may not do to your system, and I don't think you're the type who OC's his computer regularly. Just open up the application. If it doesn't show you what you want to know on the info page, just uninstall it.

Intel_Hydralisk
27th December 2004, 07:42 PM
Ah, thanks everyone. I was just wondering what my old RAM on here was. I was given 256 by dell (which i can probably look up), an additional 512 I added a while ago (I don't remember what I bought...), and I'm adding 512 more (DDR2 533 / PC2-4200 Corsair).

Flocito
27th December 2004, 11:26 PM
I'm sure this goes without saying, but you are aware that you can't mix different types of RAM, so if you are adding 512 of DDR2 533, the motherboard must first support it, and second you can mix it with something old like PC133 and expect it to work.

Your post just seemed a bit wierd, that you go 256 from Dell, then added 512 of some type you don't know, and now you are going to add DDR2 533 to your system.

John Basedow
27th December 2004, 11:32 PM
It's also weird, because wasn't 533 DDR2 PC4200 ram invented like, 4 months ago?

I think you should double check something... How did you come across this information?

TheOne
28th December 2004, 01:33 AM
DDR2 is a new technology recently released; there's not many motherboards that support it.
The same goes for PCI Express.

On top of that both are first try technologies and are currently slower than the current.

Flocito
28th December 2004, 10:24 AM
On top of that both are first try technologies and are currently slower than the current.
What exactly are you trying to say here? That DDR2 is slower than DDR1? That PCIe is slower than PCI? If so, you are wrong.

TheOne
28th December 2004, 02:36 PM
That's exactly what i'm trying to say, As of current, the original products are currently faster than the First Generation models for the new products.

Or in other words: Currently DDR/PCI is faster than DDR2/PCIe.

Flocito
28th December 2004, 03:18 PM
That's exactly what i'm trying to say, As of current, the original products are currently faster than the First Generation models for the new products.

Or in other words: Currently DDR/PCI is faster than DDR2/PCIe.
Well, like I mentioned above you are wrong. I'm not sure where you got your information, but the fastest speed for DDR is 200Mhz which means 400Mbps. The slowest DDR2 part that comes out runs at 200Mhz. Therefore the slowest DDR2 part out on the market runs at the same speed as the fastest DDR2.

As for PCI, the fastest it can run at is with the following setup: 64-bit, 66MHz combination with a bandwidth of 512MB/s. With PCIe on the other hand, a single lane is capable of transmitting 2.5Gbps in each direction, simultaneously. So even if your motherboard supports the lowest PCIe of only x1 it's faster than PCI, not to mention if your motherboard supports x16 like most do now.

TheOne
28th December 2004, 10:47 PM
In theory, Yes.

In actual tests, No.

Intel_Hydralisk
28th December 2004, 10:48 PM
In theory, Yes.

In actual tests, No.

Where are these tests you're talking about? There's no way PCI-E is slower than PCI... PCI is slower than AGP and although PCI-E isn't much faster than AGP at the moment (if at all), it's still faster than PCI!

I don't know about the ram deal... I'm getting DDR ram instead now, as I realized I have an Intel 865G motherboard which doesn't support DDR2.

TheOne
28th December 2004, 10:51 PM
Where are these tests you're talking about? There's no way PCI-E is slower than PCI... PCI is slower than AGP and although PCI-E isn't much faster than AGP at the moment (if at all), it's still faster than PCI!

I don't know about the ram deal... I'm getting DDR ram instead now, as I realized I have an Intel 865G motherboard which doesn't support DDR2.

Well, Mayby it is AGP... I can't remember...
Sorry about the AGP/PCI thing; My mind said AGP, My fingers typed PCI.
(or rather, I used the word "original" and that just plain confused me)

But DDR is currently faster than DDR2 however.

Intel_Hydralisk
28th December 2004, 11:06 PM
Well, Mayby it is AGP... I can't remember...
Sorry about the AGP/PCI thing; My mind said AGP, My fingers typed PCI.
(or rather, I used the word "original" and that just plain confused me)

But DDR is currently faster than DDR2 however.

Even if it is AGP.

The benchmarks don't show that PCIe is slower... it's just not really that much faster...

However, PCIe allows new SLI technology with nVidia cards, which ATI is about to mimick in the coming year.

And also, like I asked earlier... where are you getting this "DDR is faster than DDR2" deal from? You mentioned tests...

Flocito
29th December 2004, 12:25 AM
Who knows where he gets his info. DDR2 even out performs DDR when you overclock (http://www.overclockercafe.com/Articles/DDR_vs_DDR2/) it. But then again, what the hell would I know, I only design circuit boards with both DDR and DDR2.

From the conclusion:

When you get right down to it, for today's performance the differences between using DDR and DDR2 at 533MHz, there is little to no difference. Where DDR2 will shine, is in it's overclocking potential and the promise of future applications making use of it's enhanced speed and bandwidth.

So basically you have to overclock DDR to 533Mhz before it's performance is on par with DDR2.

As for AGP, the current version out for most motherboards is 8xAGP, which is 2034Mbps and it is slower than 16xPCIe which is the common configuration for PCIe at the moment.

If you can't bring the tech to back up your claims then keep them to yourself, nothing irritates me more then the spread of misinformation.

TheOne
29th December 2004, 01:50 AM
PCIe has more of a performance increase when editing HD video.

DDR2 has more potential but is only slightly better than DDR. (It is better, But not by too much but can get much higher speeds than possible by DDR since DDR is about at it's max)

I don't have any fancy online sources that I can throw out at people unfortunatley.