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lurchos
29th December 2005, 01:53 AM
Hi i am wondering which course is it to program programs because i want to do one next year i am a fast lerner at computer things

Carnage
29th December 2005, 07:55 AM
have you got a choice between?

If you want to program 'program' as in executable files you might want to try something like C, java or visual basic.

Xull
29th December 2005, 12:54 PM
Also, what operating system will you be learning on/want to actually program for?


most starting courses will be rather quite introductory... probably won't get much into specifics.
if you plan on continuing with programming, there may be some other factors you might want to take into consideration...

java will probably give you the most consistency across all platforms, you may also be able to run .net similarly, though I do not know how well it runs on non-windows platforms. As far as I know C can also run on every platform, but it may not be as simple to do certain things as you might want. C++ will run on a lot of platforms too... hmm well your choice.

anyway... if you want easiest programming experience (especially if you want to write GUIs), java and .net languages are probably the best choices.
there are plenty of java tutorials out there if you are interested in that.
if you are interested in .net (especially if programming for windows) there are two languages that are mainly used: vb and c#.
a lot of the samples you can find atm are probably going to be in c# (though vb has a fair number of samples as well)
Microsoft has decided to provide code samples for vb especially now (used to be c#, but it won't be forgotten either) because the majority of their customers use vb.
c# will be the language most like java, and similar to other c-ish languages (like C++, php, obj-C, etc) if you wish to use that.
if your question is vb vs c#... its just a matter of preference, many c# enthusiasts don't like vb too much because they consider it less powerful or too simple, or that vb users are less knowledgable. hmm I forget what vb users say as a counter argument.
vb and c# are actually supposed to be rather equivalent... they can be converted more or less line by line.
I personally like vb because of the beauty of the language... verbose is nice :)

there are also other languages, such as delphi and python, each of which will have its own supporters... I'm not familiar enough with either of those two, so I can't say much about it... but the people I do know that use python like it.
however, if you want to make executables, python usually is interpreted... it can be compiled but, well... its not intended for that use.

whatever you decide to use, try to be familiar enough with other languages to understand some of it... even if you don't like the language, you'll at least be able to read the code written in that language, and know why you don't like it :P

H2SO4
30th December 2005, 08:04 AM
It really depends where ur situated and whether u intend to take a taught course or study at home. Here in the UK most programmers start with vb at college, then move on to C++, etc.

If ur studying on ur own it's up to u where u begin. It depends what ur eventual outcome is, but choose one that will give u a good grounding in all the basic concepts of programing that are transferable to other languages and make ur future progress faster.

vb is an event driven language while c++ is object orientated. vb.net is also object orientated and the follow on from vb.

These links will give u more information.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_BASIC

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_programming

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_programming_language

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object_Orientated

Xull
30th December 2005, 12:45 PM
vb is an event driven language while c++ is object orientated. vb.net is also object orientated and the follow on from vb.True, however, event driven is just a possible way to have oop; C++ sends messages, vb raises events - both doing so with objects.

Both the .net version and the non .net version (microsoft decided to drop the .net suffix :assimilat ) are object oriented and event driven... vb 6.0 was com-based, so it supported interfaces and the such, but inheritance was not exactly a feature of the language. Strictly oop speaking though, it did have classes, and you could instantiate them, have multiple variables referencing the same object, linked lists, trees, and other oop structures.

with .net, vb drops some of the older basic-style methods, such as (for file access)
Open "Some file" For Output As #1
Dim Count As Integer
For Count = 1 To 10

Print #1, "Some text"
Next
Close #1 and (continuing with the same types of examples) exchanges it for stream-based access, such as
Dim SomeVariable As New StreamWriter("Some file")
For Count As Integer = 1 To 10

SomeVariable.Write("Some text")
Next
SomeVariable.Close()

In any event, should you choose vb, I suggest going with the .net version if possible.
just to illustrate some other languages (this is C#, but will be much the same in java)

FileStream SomeVariable = new StreamWriter("Some file");
for (int Count = 1; Count <= 10; Count++)

SomeVariable.Write("Some text");
SomeVariable.Close();
C++
ofstream SomeVariable("Some file");
for (int Count = 1; Count <= 10; Count++)

SomeVariable << "Some text";
SomeVariable.close();
(note that in these examples I didn't include error checking and for the purposes of consistency, the flow and counting is the same and naming convention is ignored, though not required, it is good practice to use them as well)

Each of them should have the following output:
Some textSome textSome textSome textSome textSome textSome textSome textSome textSome text

of course, this is a limited example showing only a few specific differences; feel free to ask for extended samples if you would like to see some more differences.

in any case, each language has its advantages/disadvantages; there is no "best" language, but there are languages that are simpler/easier (not necessarily less powerful) in certain applications than others for a given application (or even general)... since each person has their own opinions, what works best is for you to decide...

Perad
30th December 2005, 05:48 PM
There are many programming languages out there and many many course associated with each one, i suggest you phone up your college/uni and talk it through with them. They will get exactly what you want and suggest the best course for you.

Clarke
30th December 2005, 07:24 PM
Yea, i mean currently we're doing Pascal if that can be called a programming language, but some of the other colleges areound us are doing VB. When i asked i was told they prefer to teach us pascal as it teaches us to code "properly" as opposed to VB. I can't comment as i can't code VB but i suppose someone will have an opinion on the matter.

Carnage
30th December 2005, 08:00 PM
apparently pyton is a good language for learning to program properly since a good layout is part of the syntax :p

Xull
30th December 2005, 10:47 PM
Yea, i mean currently we're doing Pascal if that can be called a programming language, but some of the other colleges areound us are doing VB. When i asked i was told they prefer to teach us pascal as it teaches us to code "properly" as opposed to VB. I can't comment as i can't code VB but i suppose someone will have an opinion on the matter.
I don't know why... that often is a common "reason" people who don't like vb come up with... just because it has the capability for using undeclared variables and the such doesn't make it a bad language... I guess for some people "issues" with one language are "features" in another... :-/
personally I use Option Explicit and Option Strict when programming in vb... I can't stand using variables that haven't been explicitly declared, or implicit conversions for that matter.
Personally I think vb (.net) is a great language to start learning in, considering it is quite verbose... very good introduction to oop principles.
It is also quite powerful, so just because it is easy to pick up doesn't mean it isn't good enough for advanced programmers either :)
I think people who don't like it are biased on several aspects... one, it is "BASIC", and two, the B stands for "Beginners"... also, older versions have not been as powerful (Basic has changed quite a bit since it first came out... I guess some people aren't used to languages being updated with new ideas as appropriate)
I probably like vb most for its verbosity... declarations actually say what they are with the terms that are used to describe them
(like for example, methods can be declared as overridable instead of virtual)
also the blocks are more distinguishable... makes them easier to tell them apart :))
In any case... thats just my preference; others may consider the opposite...

I'm pretty sure though that some rather nasty code could be written in pascal as well... the code will only be as good as the person writing it makes it :-/


apparently pyton is a good language for learning to program properly since a good layout is part of the syntax :pI think python is the language where tabs determine blocks, right?
As far as I know python also has no explicit types though :-/
ah well... makes it good for scripting.

If you use an editor that automatically formats the text, it should lessen the problem :P
Some may argue that it would make you lazy... but well it helps a lot with consistency too... and I'd much rather see nicely formatted code :)
I've been used to auto-formatting for quite a while now... even if not using an editor/whatever that autoformats the code, I still try to make it look readable + consistent in formatting :)

oh and btw I learned most of my "proper coding" + consistent formatting from vb :P autoformatting been a standard feature for vb editors for quite a while now :D