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View Full Version : Game Review: Dance Dance Revolution Extreme (US)



Seraphim
28th April 2005, 01:19 PM
Name: Dance Dance Revolution Extreme (US Version)
Developer/Publisher: Konami
Platform: PS2
Genre: Rythym Based Simulator

Background: This is the continuation of Konami's popular dance simulator available for the PS2. While it was much anticipated by avid players (myself included) across the US when this latest installment finally shipped I found myself strangely disapponted.
Gameplay - At first glance DDR Extreme looks identical to its predecessors. The game is still centered around hitting combinations of rising arrows to the beat of one of multitude of songs. While playable with a standard PS2 controller this game is really only fun using a dance mat sold seperately. Extreme features the same modes that were available on Max and Max2 and also the inclusion of Mission and Party mode. Mission Mode has players dance to segments of certain songs with special modifiers enabled and sets certain goals the player must meet. Party mode features several minigames including some that make use of the PS2's eyetoy. While these features add a bit more flavor to the aging concept, it doesn't quite redeem the games other shortcomings given the legacy of the previous games.

Graphics - Extreme's interface is a total revamping of what DDR players have come to expect from a DDR game. However, the desired effect may be a little off from what Konami may have inteded. The globular design of many of the menu objects combined with the teal-green and metallic grey color scheme makes the game downright unpleasant to look at sometimes. What keeps this game from completely flopping in the graphics department are the in-stage graphics. Mid game graphics are generally good, and the use of cell-shading on many of the animated characters along with the iridescence of the background movies and arrows carry the lively atmosphere people have come to expect from this series. (73/100)

Sound - Like every game in the DDR series the focal point has been the music. Extreme features a respectable 30+ tracks. It pales in comparison to the over 240 available on the arcade version but holds its own against the other home versions. Unfortunately, this go around the song selection could have been a little better. Almost a third of the tracks are throwbacks from the 80s era that younger players, save the nostalgia nuts, just can't get into. Some old favorites have been brought back for a second go around such as .59, Firefly and Tsugaru and several much anticipated tracks from the Japanese version of the game like V and Love Love Sugar. On that same note though, the exclusion of certain tracks has left many DDRers frustrated and disappointed. (67/100)

Replayability - This is where every game in the DDR series wins. With almost two dozen unlockable characters, mission and party mode, and a slew of unlockable songs, DDR Extreme makes for a game that will keep you coming back for months if you can into it and forgive the comparatively easy difficulty. Interested newbies to the series will be able to enjoy this game even more with the inclusion of beginner mode and several training lessons that dramitically ease the learning curve of the game turning frustration into fun. (94/100)

Overall - For those new to the series DDR Extreme is quite simply a great buy if you've been wanting to enter the realm of rythym based games. For seasoned veterans, you may want to think twice before purchasing this one. Mission mode will provide you with a great deal of challenges but there just isn't enough here to outshine Max or Max2 and you may just be better off waiting for Ultramix2 to come out on the X-Box (78/100)